Spring Break Library Services

Yes, Thigpen Library in Gallatin is OPEN during Vol State’s spring break week, March 5 through March 9, but operating on a reduced schedule: 8am to 4:30pm only. Note that we are closed on Saturday, March 10.

Our library staff in Springfield, Cookeville, and Livingston will be taking the entire week of spring break offContact the Gallatin library staff during this period: we’ll gladly assist you.

To help you plan each day, here are the VSCC Gallatin Library’s operating hours around spring break:

  • Friday, March 2: regular hours, 7:30am to 4:30pm
  • Saturday, March 3: regular hours, 8am to 4pm
  • Monday, March 5 through Friday, March 9: 8am to 4:30pm
  • Saturday, March 10: Closed
  • Sunday, March 11: Closed (regularly)
  • Monday, March 12: regular hours resume, 7:30am to 8:30pm

Will you be working on that research assignment as you sun yourself on a sunny beach during spring break week? Hopefully, you’ve planned ahead so that isn’t necessary. But, Thigpen Library is to the rescue!

Our CHAT and TEXT, (615) 956-2275 (2ASK), service operates 24/7 every day, all year! Get in touch to get the research assistance you need: Ask A Librarian.

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Image: “A Volume of Ocean Knowledge,” by Peter Matthews; http://theappendix.net/images/issues/1/4/

Bookstores and Libraries

What’s similar between the Vol State bookstore and the library?
What’s the difference between the Vol State bookstore and the library?

Key similarities include:

  • bookstores and libraries both make books available, including textbooks;
  • they both exist to support student learning needs;
  • they both provide you with excellent customer service.

Key differences include:

  • libraries lend resources at no cost to you;
  • bookstores rent or sell resources with a cost to you.

[highlight background=”” color=””]Why are these differences important to understand?[/highlight]

Choose the right location based on the PURPOSE of your information need.

If you need long-term access to the resource, such as a required textbook for your class, then renting it or buying it from the College bookstore makes sense. You’ll be glad to have that resource handy when studying late at night or on a weekend; and, you can mark up your personally-owned, print books with highlighters and margin notes to help you remember key points.

If you need short-term access to the resource, then use the library’s resources for free. These free resources include more than 100 databases (access millions of e-books and online articles) plus more than 40,000 physical items that can be checked out for weekly periods. Too…

  • Thigpen Library does have some of your course textbooks (in library terminology, these are called “course reserves”): these textbooks are made available for short-term, typically 2-hour, check-out periods for in-library use.
  • Unlike personally owned resources, physical library resources are shared by many users so they cannot be highlighted, marked, or otherwise altered.

Were these differences intuitive to you? Great! Hopefully, this information will be helpful to anyone for whom these differences were never explained. We get a lot of bookstore inquiries at the library, so we know “the struggle is real” for some folks.

Never be afraid to ASK Thigpen Library for assistance. We’ll be glad to help you get the information you need, even if it’s the phone number to the Bookstore. Smile.

students are studying in the library
A group of students studying in the library.

Winter Break Reading Recs.

Need some reading recommendations to help you better enjoy winter break? If you’re at the Gallatin campus, then Thigpen Library has many great titles from 2017 for you to borrow. (At another campus site location? Request for delivery of materials is possible, but it requires a full week of planning time.)

Highlighted below are just *a few* of this year’s new additions that made it to “best of 2017” lists.

New York Times “The 10 Best Books of 2017” editors picks:

“Locking Up Our Own” by James Forman

“Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee

Goodreads Readers’ Choice Awards:

“Into the Water” by Paula Hawkins

“Astrophysics for People in a Hurry” by Neil deGrasse Tyson

Washington Post’s “50 Notable Works of Fiction 2017”:

“Lincoln in the Bardo” by George Saunders (Winner of the Man Booker Prize)

“American War” by Omar El Akkad

“The Essex Serpent” by Sarah Perry

“Norse Mythology” by Neil Gaiman

Washington Post’s “50 Notable Works of Non-Fiction 2017”:

“Janesville: An American Story” by Amy Goldstein

“The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America” by Frances FitzGerald

“The Blood of Emmett Till” by Timothy B. Tyson

“Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body” by Roxane Gay

National Book Awards 2017:

“The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia” by Masha Gessen (Non-Fiction Winner)

“Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016” by Frank Bidart (Poetry Winner)

Also owned, but checked-out, is Jesmyn Ward’s “Sing, Unburied, Sing,” Fiction winner. Call us (x3400) to place a hold on it; or, sign-in to your Pioneer Search account (same login as My VolState) and request it via the Pioneer Search record.

 

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read, Sept. 24 – 30.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community – librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types – in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Thigpen Library is celebrating Banned Books Week by hosting an open mic on Wednesday, September 27th from 12:45-2:15pm at the SRB Amphitheater (rain location: SRB Performing Arts Space). Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to read a passage from a Banned Book provided by the library.

For more information on banned books, see the American Library Association’s Banned and Challenged Books website.

Why are books challenged?

Books are usually challenged to shield others (typically children) from difficult ideas and information. The most common reasons for banning a book are sexually explicit material, offensive language, or material unsuitable for a particular age group.

Who challenges books?

Typically, books are challenged by parents and library patrons.

WHO challenges books ala 2017

 

What books have been challenged?

You might be surprised at some of the books that have been challenged. Frequently challenged books include The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, To Kill a Mockingbird, and the Harry Potter series.